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Blogs > Office Jotter

An update on OpenOffice.org and LibreOffice
Roger Whitehead By: Roger Whitehead, Director, Office Futures
Published: 29th January 2011
Copyright Office Futures © 2011

I mentioned these products in my recent posting, “Oracle Open Office goes vaporous”. Both have now moved to version 3.3.

OpenOffice.org (OOo) 3.3 was released this week after five months of beta testing. There’s a review of it at ZDNet UK, which reports only minor changes in this version. The release notes confirm this. Since Oracle’s product, Open Office (OOO), keeps in step with the free version, the same will apply there.

I’ve seen nothing new about Oracle’s Cloud Office other than these screen grabs on Silicon.com. The company’s support forum looks quiet, too, with only 29 messages when I looked. Almost a year ago, Eric Lai posted this technical critique of Cloud Office. It stands scrutiny today, mutatis mutandis.

The Document Foundation also released version 3.3 of its office product this week. LibreOffice had been on a three-month beta. Details of its new features are here. There are some small differences with OpenOffice 3.3 but hardly enough to warrant switching from one to the other.

LibreOffice is  finding increasing favour in the Linux market and will be bundled with future releases (‘distros’) of Ubuntu, Red Hat’s Fedora and Novell’s openSUSE. These decisions are as likely to have been based on organizational considerations as on technical grounds. Oracle, like Sun before it, is not much trusted by the open source crowd.

Both products are available for Microsoft Windows and Apple’s Mac OS as well as Linux. OpenOffice.org will also run on Solaris.

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